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Gov. Burgum names new leader of North Dakota Department of Transportation

Ron Henke joined NDDOT in 1990 as the director of operations and project development. He later became the deputy director of engineering and oversaw operations, project development, pre-construction, construction and maintenance.

Ron Henke.jpg
Ron Henke.
Submitted photo
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BISMARCK — Gov. Doug Burgum has appointed Ron Henke as the new head of the North Dakota Department of Transportation.

Henke has served as interim NDDOT director since Sept. 9. His appointment is effective immediately.

In announcing the appointment Thursday, Oct. 13, Burgum cited Henke's "deep knowledge of the state’s transportation infrastructure, long history of service to the state and leadership on many key NDDOT initiatives over the years."

Henke joined NDDOT in 1990 as the director of operations and project development. He later became the deputy director of engineering and oversaw operations, project development, pre-construction, construction and maintenance.

“Through the NDDOT team and with support from the administration and legislature, we will continue to maintain the highest standards for our infrastructure, adopt new technologies and implement innovative approaches to provide the safest transportation system and most efficient and effective service possible to North Dakota citizens,” Henke said in a statement.

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Henke grew up on a farm in central North Dakota. He earned bachelor’s degrees in construction management and construction engineering from North Dakota State University.

With 982 employees and a biennial budget of $2.2 billion, NDDOT manages a transportation system with about 8,518 miles of roads and 4,858 bridges. Annually, the department processes more than 1 million vehicle registrations and serves more than 500,000 licensed drivers at branch offices.

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