WASHINGTON -- President Donald Trump on Friday promised to renew his effort to end the Obama-era program that protects undocumented immigrants brought here as children from deportation, a day after the Supreme Court ruled to keep it in place.

In a morning tweet, Trump seized on the fact that the 5-4 decision did not address the merits of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, but rather said that the administration had not provided proper legal justification for ending it.

"The Supreme Court asked us to resubmit on DACA, nothing was lost or won. They 'punted,' much like in a football game (where hopefully they would stand for our great American Flag). We will be submitting enhanced papers shortly in order to properly fulfil the Supreme Court's ruling & request of yesterday," Trump wrote.

"I have wanted to take care of DACA recipients better than the Do Nothing Democrats, but for two years they refused to negotiate - They have abandoned DACA. Based on the decision the Dems can't make DACA citizens. They gained nothing!" Trump continued.

It is unclear what paperwork Trump intends to submit, but any effort to end DACA will surely be met again by legal challenges and would probably not be settled before the election.

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The White House declined to provide any details beyond the president's tweet.

Trump has often seemed ambivalent about DACA recipients, known as Dreamers, lauding them at some points and declaring they are "no angels" at others. But his administration has tried since September 2017 to end the program. It was implemented as an executive action by Obama in 2012 after a failed congressional attempt at comprehensive immigration reform.

There have been several unsuccessful efforts to reach a deal on DACA. During the 2019 government shutdown, there was talk of an agreement between Trump and congressional Democrats to link funding for Trump's wall at the Mexican border with permanent protections for DACA recipients, but that ultimately fell apart.

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This article was written by Colby Itkowitz and Robert Barnes, reporters for The Washington Post.