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Marshall County seeking feedback for updated plan to mitigate effects of natural disasters

The project assesses the natural hazards that pose a risk to the county — such as tornadoes, straight line winds, ice storms, blizzards, wildfires, flooding and extreme temperatures — and identifies ways to minimize the damage from those natural hazards in the future.

Aerial image of Oslo, Minn., Tuesday. The Red at Oslo stood at 37.37 feet. Lee Smalt/Click Content Studios
Oslo, Minnesota, in Marshall County, is often affected by flooding. It's a natural hazard for which Marshall County Emergency Management hopes to develop a better plan.
Lee Smalt / Click Content Studios
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WARREN, Minn. – The Marshall County Office of Emergency Management is seeking feedback from county residents and business owners as it updates a plan it hopes will help lessen the impact of natural disasters.

In a release on Monday, Aug. 8, the Marshall County Office of Emergency Management announced it is working with U-Spatial, at the University of Minnesota Duluth, to update the county’s Multi-Hazard Mitigation Plan. The MHMP assesses the natural hazards that pose a risk to the county — such as tornadoes, straight line winds, ice storms, blizzards, wildfires, flooding and extreme temperatures — and identifies ways to minimize the damage from those natural hazards in the future.

“Hazard mitigation planning is a central part of our emergency management program,” Josh Johnson, Marshall County emergency management director, said in the release. “Understanding the natural hazards that can cause serious impact to our communities and taking action to reduce or eliminate the impact of future disasters makes us more resilient.”

According to the release, the Marshall County MHMP is multi-jurisdictional and covers the cities of Alvarado, Argyle, Grygla, Holt, Middle River, Newfolden, Oslo, Stephen, Strandquist, Viking and Warren. It also incorporates the needs of townships, school districts and area agencies. The team that updates the plan is made up of representatives from county departments, local municipalities and school districts, and other stakeholders.

Marshall County Emergency Management is asking residents and business owners what natural hazards they feel pose the greatest risk to their communities, and what actions or projects could help reduce damage from future events for personal properties, communities and the county as a whole. The feedback will be used while drafting the new plan.

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Comments, questions and concerns regarding natural disasters and potential mitigation actions should be submitted to Marshall County Emergency Management by phone (218-745-5841), email or comment on the Marshall County Emergency Facebook post about the MHMP.

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"One of the old things we used to say is the lake is not a bathtub, it doesn't just lay at one level," said Pete Boulay, a climatologist with the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. "What I always point out, when people complain that (water levels) have never been this low, just go back farther and you'll find lower water than you have right now."

Related Topics: FLOODING
Ingrid Harbo joined the Grand Forks Herald in September 2021.

Harbo covers Grand Forks region news, and also writes about business in Grand Forks and the surrounding area.

Readers can reach Harbo at 701-780-1124 or iharbo@gfherald.com. Follow her on Twitter @ingridaharbo.
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