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New partnership will allow students at Ohio college to pursue UND engineering degree

With this new partnership, students at Defiance College, a private college of about 500 students in Defiance, Ohio, will be able to earn a math degree at Defiance and a civil or electrical engineering degree from UND.

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UND President Andy Armacost shakes hands with Richanne C. Mankey, president of Defiance College in Defiance, Ohio, after the two presidents signed a dual-degree partnership agreement.
Tom Dennis / UND Today
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GRAND FORKS – UND has signed an agreement with Defiance College in Ohio that will allow students there to earn a UND engineering degree.

With this new partnership, students at Defiance College, a private college of about 500 students in Defiance, Ohio, will be able to earn a math degree at Defiance and a civil or electrical engineering degree from UND, according to a UND press release.

Defiance is the 10th campus with which UND’s College of Engineering & Mines now partners in dual-degree programs.

“We’re very excited to be able to add Defiance College to our list of partners,” said Brian Tande, the dean of UND’s College of Engineering and Mines. “This agreement will allow students to study engineering and prepare themselves for a wealth of career opportunities while also benefiting from Defiance’s very student-focused learning environment.”

Defiance students who study for a math degree on campus simultaneously will be able to take online courses to earn a UND Engineering degree.

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Agnes Caldwell, academic dean at Defiance College and vice president of academic affairs, celebrated the new partnership and the opportunities it offers.

“We’ve had a large number of prospective students who’ve been interested in engineering over the years, and we’re thrilled to be able to meet that need,” she said.

Defiance is adding faculty in both math and physics, with the goal of making sure students who take the dual-degree track have all the support on campus that they need, Caldwell said.

The agreement calls for Defiance students to take a total of five years to complete their two degrees, earning a bachelor’s degree in mathematics from Defiance while studying for a UND bachelor’s degree in civil or electrical engineering.

On June 20, President Richanne Mankey and Dean Caldwell from Defiance visited UND to tour the campus and sign the new agreement in person with UND President Andrew Armacost.

“Through this collaboration, UND and Defiance both can strengthen their enrollments, while enabling Defiance students to not only earn engineering and math degrees, but also keep attending the Ohio college they love,” said Armacost. “We’re proud to be a leader in this innovative and cost-effective educational model.”

The new arrangement stems in part from UND and Defiance’s work with the Lower Cost Models Consortium, a coalition of private colleges and universities committed to making higher education more accessible for students and sustainable for the long term. The consortium specializes in helping its institutions collaborate to offer more academic programs, especially in fields that are in high demand in the marketplace.

Ingrid Harbo joined the Grand Forks Herald in September 2021.

Harbo covers Grand Forks region news, and also writes about business in Grand Forks and the surrounding area.

Readers can reach Harbo at 701-780-1124 or iharbo@gfherald.com. Follow her on Twitter @ingridaharbo.
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