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Grand Forks Fire Department responds to report of explosion at LM Wind, but no active fire upon arrival

The local business resumed normal operations after the facility was determined to be safe.

Grand Forks fire truck - lucin.jpg
Herald file photo
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GRAND FORKS — Crews from the Grand Forks Fire Department responded to an incident at LM Wind Power on Tuesday, Dec. 20.

According to a release from the GFFD, the call came at 3:18 p.m. Crews were dispatched to 1580 S. 48th St. "for a report of an explosion," according to the release sent to the media.

According to the release, "when crews arrived on the scene, they found that the building was evacuated, and the fire protection system was operating. When they entered the building, they found no active fire. After the building was deemed safe, the business could resume normal operations."

No cause has been determined but the investigation continues.

The GFFD sent five engines, one truck, a command vehicle and 19 personnel. Ambulance services from Altru Health System responded as well. One person was transported with unknown injuries.

Related Topics: FIRES
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