ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Devils Lake educator wins national award for adult education efforts

On April 29 during the 2022 Mountain Plains Adult Education annual conference in Tempe, Arizona, Bridget Hanlan was announced as the organization’s recipient of its Award of Merit, according to a news release.

Bridget Doug.jpg
Bridget Hanlan, director of the Adult Learning Center located at Lake Region State College in Devils Lake, and Doug Darling, president of LRSC, stand with the Award of Merit given to Hanlan from the Mountain Plains Adult Education organization.
Contributed / Lake Region State College
We are part of The Trust Project.

GRAND FORKS — The director of the Adult Learning Center located at Lake Region State College in Devils Lake has received a national award for her leadership in supporting adult education.

According to an LRSC release, on April 29 during the 2022 Mountain Plains Adult Education annual conference in Tempe, Arizona, Bridget Hanlan was announced as the organization’s recipient of its Award of Merit.

The Mountain Plains Adult Education Association Award of Merit is given to honor an individual who has made an outstanding contribution toward furthering the concept of adult education. It is the highest award given by the nine-state association.

Hanlan was nominated for this award because “she continuously goes above and beyond to reinvent the Region III Adult Learning Center to make it one of the most successful centers in North Dakota,” according to the release.

Hanlan has been a part of the North Dakota Association for Lifelong Learning’s conference committee for the last four years, and has held offices such as scholarship chair, vice president and president.

ADVERTISEMENT

In July 2020, she was recognized by Gov. Doug Burgum during his Education Summit as the recipient of the InnovateND Award for encouraging a collaborative culture. In September 2021, she was the recipient of the NDALL Leadership and Service Award.

The Adult Learning Centers and satellite sites are open to serve members of the public who need basic education and secondary education services. The free programs at the centers are available for people who:

  • are at least 16 years of age
  • are not enrolled in high school
  • do not have a high school diploma
  • are mandated by state law
  • may lack sufficient mastery of basic educational skills
  • cannot speak, read, or write the English language.

Services available in each Adult Learning Center include: reading/writing, science, social studies, math, digital literacy skills, English Language acquisition for adults who are unable to read, speak or write English, workplace and career planning and readiness, and GED preparation and testing. Information about how to contact the centers, and their locations can be found on the North Dakota Department of Public Instruction’s website.

READ MORE EDUCATION COVERAGE HERE
The policy faces another hurdle as the administration contests a separate Nov. 10 ruling by a federal judge in Texas deeming the program unlawful.

Related Topics: EDUCATIONLAKE REGION STATE
Adam Kurtz is the community editor for the Grand Forks Herald. He covers higher education and other topics in Grand Forks County and the city.

Kurtz joined the Herald in July 2019. He covered business and county government topics before covering higher education and some military topics.

Tips and story ideas are welcome. Get in touch with him at akurtz@gfherald.com, or DM at @ByAdamKurtz.

Desk: 701-780-1110
What to read next
Forum, hosted by Grand Forks Public Schools, allowed city, county and school officials to brief legislators on their respective priorities
Their final dispositional conference is scheduled for Feb. 9.
Denver Fowler, renowned paleontologist and curator of the Badlands Dinosaur Museum in Dickinson, shares his ground breaking research on a newly discovered species of North American tyrannosaur. His work provides a link in a lineage leading to T-rex.
As common respiratory illnesses like COVID-19, influenza and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) spread this winter, vaccines are the best way to prevent serious outcomes said Shawn McBride, public health epidemiologist.