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That other story about the goats

Jessie Veeder recalls a high school memory fit for a cowgirl — being called into the office because her goat was on the loose around town.

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Rodeo memories.
Contributed / Jessie Veeder
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WATFORD CITY, N.D. — Did I ever tell you about the time my best friend and I went to pick up a goat in her dad’s old Lincoln?

I just got my driver’s permit and off we went 20 miles on the highway to pick up a rodeo goat from our neighbor. I think I told you this, but it’s one of those core memories you get when you’re young enough that not too many scary things have happened to you yet and old enough to start putting yourself properly in harm’s way.

Anyway, it ended up with a blown tire and two 13-year-old girls in the ditch crying in the rain by the old church and it ended with our friend’s grandpa helping us change a tire and a goat standing in the back seat popping his head up between us as I drove that Lincoln back home at 30 mph.

This is what friendship, teenage-hood and wild and free looked like in the '90s, before cellphones, affordable all-wheel-drive vehicles and hovering parents. Mostly we were left to our own devices, and mostly we were fine until the times we teetered on the edge of disaster on a back road somewhere.

"Coming Home" columnist Jessie Veeder writes to her husband about a recent weekend together in a small mountain town that, just days before, was on the edge of a flooding disaster.

Anyway, a few weeks ago I entered my daughters in a kids’ rodeo in my hometown. I spent some of my life entered in barrel racing, pole bending and, of course, goat tying in high school rodeo back in a time where you could bring your fastest, most sound ranch horse to town in a stock trailer freshly cleared of cow poop and you wouldn’t be entirely laughed off the rodeo grounds.

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I wasn’t competitive really (*read, ranch horse), but I had fun working to beat my time and with my friends on the road trips across the state where we would ride part of the way in the gooseneck of that trailer, bundled up and stretched among the horses as the highway rumbled underneath us. (And that’s just one example of '90s safety standards and I’m hoping the statute of limitations protects my parents in this confession, amen.)

The thing about the sport of rodeo is that it’s more about the practice, practice, practice than the 12-20 second race you’re running, or the 1-8 second ride. And I loved to practice, particularly goat tying (hence, the goat-getting adventure). For those of you unfamiliar with the event, in goat tying the cowgirl races her horse at its highest speed down the center of the arena where a goat is staked and waiting for her. The cowgirl dismounts the still-moving-at-a-rapid-speed horse, hits the ground running (literally and hopefully) and catches that goat, flips it over and ties three of its legs together. The girl with the fastest time wins — and now that I’ve typed that all out, it sounds sorta brutal.

But the goats weren’t injured, switched often and were well cared for between rodeos. The girls? Well, there’s plenty of face planting and dirt eating in this sport to which I’ve contributed my fair share of statistics.

"Coming Home" columnist Jessie Veeder says summer is magic, and it’s easy to forget that in the reality of living in this adult-sized world.

Anyway, my girls are too young to enter the goat tying portion of the rodeo, but when I led them into that old indoor arena in my hometown, the one that served as a hockey rink in the winter, the smell of the cool dirt, concrete walls and horse sweat transported me back to my high school rodeo days when my girlfriends and I would spend countless hours practicing our goat-tying dismounts inside the dimly lit and echoey walls.

The taste of that dirt hopped right back on my tongue and I swear I scooped some out of my waistband as I remembered us as teenagers hauling our goats to town in the early mornings to put them up in the fairground’s pens while we went to history, then algebra, then choir, then earth science, with the plan to practice tying those goats right after school.

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Goat tying was just part of high school life when growing up on the ranch.
Contributed / Jessie Veeder

But our plan to practice together, comfortable and temperature-controlled in a real, indoor arena, honing our skills no matter the North Dakota weather, didn’t come without a handful of hitches. Well, just one hitch really. One hitch a handful of times.

Because I’m not sure what qualified as embarrassing in your high school experience, but getting called by name, over the intercom for the entire school to hear, “Jessie, Gwen, Nikki, please come to the office right now. Your goats have escaped and they’re loose around town. Again, Jessie, Gwen and Nikki, your goats are loose in town and you need to go get them,” could have qualified for us if we weren’t so thrilled for an excuse to leave in the middle of the school day to go do cowgirl stuff.

Did I ever tell you that story about the goats? No? Well, there it is.

Jessie Veeder is a musician and writer living with her husband and daughters on a ranch near Watford City, N.D. She blogs at https://veederranch.com. Readers can reach her at jessieveeder@gmail.com.
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