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TASTE OF THE HOLIDAYS: Tips for making the turkey

I like to brine my turkeys in any standard recipe available over the Internet. Usually I use a cooler and soak them for a couple of days. It is really juicy, and I would urge your readers to try it. I also like to bake the turkey in a standard ov...

Taste of the Holidays

I like to brine my turkeys in any standard recipe available over the Internet. Usually I use a cooler and soak them for a couple of days. It is really juicy, and I would urge your readers to try it. I also like to bake the turkey in a standard oven and then finish it over charcoal with some soaked apple wood to throw on the coals. The resulting flavor and nearly red-coppery hued skin is worth the effort.

Phil Murphy, Portland, N.D.

I do suggest keeping the Butterball hot line number close at hand if it's your first turkey. ((8000 BUTTERBALL)

Helen Volk-Schill, Cavalier, N.D.

Bake the turkey wrapped in two thicknesses of heavy aluminum foil after having brushed the turkey with salt, salad oil and butter. After baking four hours at 325 degrees, open the foil and continue to bake the bird, basting with oil and butter for about 25 more minutes to give it a nice brown color.

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Celine Leyendecker, Jamestown

Related Topics: FOOD
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