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PRODUCT REVIEW: Inexpensive knife sharpener works surprisingly well

I should start by saying that unless we want to buy products on our own dime, we Herald product reviewers are limited to spending about $10 per item.

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I should start by saying that unless we want to buy products on our own dime, we Herald product reviewers are limited to spending about $10 per item.

That's why instead of getting a fancy knife sharpener I could have confidence in, I bought one for about $2 at CVS.

My mother has a thing about sharp knives; you can put money on the fact that if she uses anyone else's, she will complain they are dull and her own, while frequently sharpened, are only up to the task occasionally.

I, on the other hand, received knives as a Christmas gift in December 2013. I brought the knives up with me from South to North Dakota, where they've lived loosely sliding around in a drawer and never touched a sharpener.

The Good Cook knife sharpener is small and easy to hold with a ridge near the center that keeps a person's thumb from sliding into a spot where it would most likely be chopped clean off. The sound the knife makes is cringeworthy as it slides through the two white sharpening plates, but by golly, it actually works.

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The way I treat my knives is exactly what you're not supposed to do according to a handful of websites I visited on the subject; I don't store them properly, I occasionally wash them in the dishwasher and I always slide them the wrong way against the surface of my cutting board.

I tested my progress on a piece of paper and found that while I had to saw pretty hard to get through the edge before using the Good Cook, it sliced right into the paper with ease afterward.

There have to be better knife sharpening kits out there, but in all honesty, the Good Cook does the job for about the cost of a cup of coffee, and that's exactly what I want. It might not turn my kitchen utensils into mini, precision-cutting samurai swords, but it does, in general, make them less dull.

I haven't owned it long and the sharpener might not work well after a few more uses, but I'd say it's still worth the very little I had to spend on it.

Rating: B

Price: $1.99 at CVS

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