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Marilyn Hagerty: Tips for walking on ice

Don't walk with your hands in your pockets. This reduces your balance if you slip on the ice. Take short to medium steps or shuffle your feet in very icy areas. When walking on icy surfaces, curl your toes under and walk as flat footed as possibl...

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Marilyn Haggerty

Don't walk with your hands in your pockets. This reduces your balance if you slip on the ice.

Take short to medium steps or shuffle your feet in very icy areas. When walking on icy surfaces, curl your toes under and walk as flat footed as possible.

The time has come to bring out my list of suggestions for walking on ice. It comes from advice given over the years at Altru Hospital and UND.

And I have saved it.

• Wear boots or overshoes with grip soles. Slick leather or rubbery soles on dress shoes are unsafe on ice.

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• Don't carry or swing heavy loads, such as large boxes or cases that could cause you to lose balance.

These days we need to place full attention to walking on ice. We can't divert our attention by texting someone or digging around in a pocket to find the car key.

Nine days

Meanwhile, people are talking turkey around Grand Forks. Nine days remain before Thanksgiving.

And there's a display out in front of the Doug and Sandy Norby home at 3209 Belmont Road that says "Give thanks, eat chicken."

UND Boosters

In this season of giving thanks, the UND sports boosters are joining in. They chose to honor and thank a couple who have long been helping out with scholarships and music. Mary Loyland and Don Berntsen were surprised when the announcement was Friday made by emcee Lowell Schweigert.

She is a semi-retired accountant professor who goes the extra mile with etiquette dinners that send students on their way. He is a former UND football player who has supported the teams. And he shows up regularly to play with the booster band at Friday luncheons.

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Giving thanks

Most of the time, it's easy to gripe. You wonder how come it takes so long to get onto South Washington Street. You wonder how long are those trains that roll through the downtown intersections. You wonder why the person in front of you bought so many groceries. You wonder who sets off those winds that swing down from the north.

With Thanksgiving closing in, there is time to be thankful. It's good that Mayor Brown always wears a smile. Then there's the excitement of a new hockey season unfolding. There's the warmth of the kitchen. And pumpkin pie.

Juanita the Wasp and Philip the Fly have gone South for the winter. Those of us who stay behind wait for basketball and hockey games. There's the sun in the western sky and the quiet of winter settling in.

There's the eternal question: "Are you going away for the winter?"

One woman I know always asks, "Well, do I have to?"

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Related Topics: MARILYN HAGERTY
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