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JEFF TIEDEMAN: Stone fruit are the pits

I've always found word-association exercises interesting. Psychologists use these tests for assessing personality traits and conflicts, in which the subject responds to a given word with the first thing that comes to mind.

Jeff Tiedeman
Jeff Tiedeman

I've always found word-association exercises interesting. Psychologists use these tests for assessing personality traits and conflicts, in which the subject responds to a given word with the first thing that comes to mind.

For example, when some people hear the word dog, they counter with cat. In food terms, that would be like saying french fries after a person flips out the word hamburger. There also are many board and card games on the market, including my favorite, "Apples to Apples," which are based on the same premise.

I thought about this recently when a flier came in the mail promoting the annual Grand Forks Area Youth for Christ peach fundraiser.

Whenever I used to hear the word peach, an episode of the hit 1970s TV sitcom "All in Family" came to mind in which Edith's shopping cart loaded with canned cling peaches (in heavy syrup) gets away from her, resulting in a minor paint scratch on the hood of a priest's car. Edith, who always tried to do the right thing, left her name, phone number and address on the car, much to Archie's chagrin.

Actually, peaches also bring back memories of the tasty jams and slices of the tasty stone fruit preserved in Mason jars of my youth. My grandmother always had a shelf full of them in her pantry, and Mom occasionally put some up.

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Therese and I have kept up the tradition. A few years back, we made plum jam, and we had luck with apricots from a neighbor's tree last summer, canning some in sauce as well as making jam that turned out to be pretty tasty.

And this year, we're going to can some of the tasty Colorado peaches that the YFC is selling.

Cody Weckerly, executive director of the local YFC, which partners with local schools and other community organizations to provide Christ-centered relationships and biblical teaching to youth, said the dispersal of last week's delivery of nearly 900 lugs went well.

"We had a drive-through set up this year" for those who preordered (about 500), Cody said. "There were no huge lines like last year."

The second shipment of the peaches (1,000 lugs) will be available from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday in the Faith Evangelical Free Church parking lot, 1400 24th Ave. S. Loads also will be coming Sept. 1 and 7. (Preordering is suggested but not required. You can find out how to place an order and get on next year's mailing list at www.gfyfc.org/peaches/ .)

If you can't make it to the church, YFC will be selling lugs (for $31) Friday on South Washington Street near the Ski and Bike Shop and Saturday downtown at the Farmers Market.

The price may seem steep to some, but the quality more than makes up for it.

So much so, that now when I hear the word peach, I'll think of YFC.

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Tiedeman is food editor at the Herald. Reach him at (701) 780-1136 or toll-free at (800) 477-6572, or e-mail at jtiedeman@gfherald.com .

Related Topics: FOOD
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