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No more crying? Testing the tearless onion

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Sunions are the result of 30 years of natural cross-breeding to produce the nation's first tearless onion. Photo courtesy of the National Onion Association2 / 2

FARGO — What do you suppose is the No. 1 question people ask The National Onion Association? (Besides of course, "Seriously, there's something called The National Onion Association?")

The answer is: "How can I cut an onion without crying?"

There seems to be about 2 million answers for that. That's the number that comes up when you plug that question into Google. Solutions range from "wear goggles" to "run water" to "keep a piece of bread in your mouth." (Carbs are the solution for everything, aren't they?)

But the truth is most remedies aren't that successful because of the nature of why onions cause us to blubber like babies in the first place. When the onion is cut, a self-defense mechanism releases volatile enzymes that irritate our eyes. That's when we launch into self-protective mode. Our eyes release tears to flush the irritant away.

It's an uphill battle. Basically, we're fighting nature.

Thankfully, science has given us a little hope — the newest solution to no more tears onion slicing — the Sunion. The Sunion is a small, sweet onion, produced in Nevada and Washington, that is supposedly America's first-ever tearless onion.

It's the result of 30 years of research which involved naturally cross-breeding onions that produced the fewest amount of tears. In addition to dry eyes in the house, the onion apparently has a milder aftertaste than other onions and gets sweeter the longer it sits.

We decided the only way to test these claims was to try it out for ourselves with a cutting board, knife and a pile of onions —- white, yellow, red and Sunions.

Will the Sunion live up to its hype or will it reduce us to a puddle of tears the way so many onions have in the past? #TheHeartbreakIsReal.

We picked up the Sunions at Walmart and got to work.

Tracy Briggs

Tracy Briggs is a former TV anchor/radio host currently working as a features writer and video host for Forum Communications.

(701) 451-5632
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