ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Easy art hanging

FARGO -- My apartment walls are sprinkled with holes that signify failed attempts at hanging art. I'd enthusiastically get my hammer out without planning the layout of the collage wall or the distance between two frames. It almost always resulted...

Hanging art
Here's a tip to hanging art on Better Homes and Gardens magazine's website that eliminates goof-ups and keeps my walls (mostly) free of extra holes.

FARGO -- My apartment walls are sprinkled with holes that signify failed attempts at hanging art.

I'd enthusiastically get my hammer out without planning the layout of the collage wall or the distance between two frames. It almost always resulted in ugly holes because I'd rehang and rehang.

I found a tip on Better Homes and Gardens magazine's website that eliminates goof-ups and keeps my walls (mostly) free of extra holes.

WHAT YOU'LL NEED

Large pieces of scrap paper (Kraft paper works well)

ADVERTISEMENT

Painter's tape

Hammer

Nails and/or picture hooks

Level

Tape measure

DIRECTIONS

1. Trace the outline on paper of each frame you want to hang. Cut out the shapes.

2. Tape the outlines to the wall using painter's tape.

ADVERTISEMENT

3. Move the paper frames around until you find an eye-pleasing arrangement.

4. Hang your framed art and tear the paper away after the nails are in. Be sure to use a level so the art hangs straight.

This trick also works for hanging mirrors, wall clocks and sconces.

Source: Better Homes and Gardens

What To Read Next
Columnist Tammy Swift says certain foods have become so expensive and in-demand that they outshine the traditional Valentine's Day gifts like roses or jewelry. Bouquet of eggs, anyone?
This week, gardening columnist Don Kinzler fields questions about planting potatoes, rabbit-resistant shrubs, and how to prevent tomato blossom end rot.
Columnist Jessie Veeder shares her reflections on the passage of time during a recent stroll of her farmstead.
Trends include vegetable gardens in raised pods and a continuing surge in using native plants and grasses.