ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ITASCA STATE PARK

Black bears live in the forests throughout the Itasca State Park area and normally avoid people. But when humans leave out food sources with enticing odors, such as bird feeders, unsecured garbage cans or remnants of campfire cooking and picnics, bears will come.
I have long taken myself to the woods for the quiet and contemplation that solitude affords.
Elk roaming free in northwestern Minnesota today are the result of a program at Itasca State Park to reintroduce the species to the state.
As of Wednesday afternoon, the Bohall Trail fire was approximately 9 acres and 5% contained, the DNR said, and a hose line has been completed around the fire.

ADVERTISEMENT

Latest Headlines
Because of the drought, the changing colors of leaves might not be quite as dramatic as other years but a little more muted.
On Tuesday, July 20, organizations gathered press and politicians at the Headwaters of the Mississippi River in Itasca State Park to demonstrate the impacts of Line 3 to states downstream on the Mississippi River, and speak about treaty rights.
The law enforcement presence has been minimal so far, with some Hubbard County sheriff’s deputies nearby along with some Minnesota State Patrol troopers and Department of Natural Resources officers. At one point, however, a U.S. Border Patrol helicopter flew in very low to try to flush out demonstrators from the site. It hovered about 20 feet off the ground, blowing up sand and dirt aggressively. A loudspeaker broadcast warned people they would be arrested if they didn’t leave the area.
Everyone’s trying to paddle the length of the Mississippi River in record time. But really, they just want to beat each other, and to do it soundly. That’s the thing about this trip. You have to have the right sort of motivation, and setting a record alone doesn’t seem to be enough.
Source of the Mississippi River
While many people spent the cold weekend snug in their homes, Hal and Ronda Sanders of Bemidji were making their most of their time at Itasca State Park by getting out on the trails.

ADVERTISEMENT

By the time these words see print (or light up a few computer screens), I should be having breakfast – Grape-Nuts cereal with blueberries or sliced bananas – at my campsite on the outer edge of Itasca State Park’s Pine Ridge Campground.
In all, the Mississippi River travels through 43 towns, 20 counties and three tribal nationas as it makes its way to the Iowa border.
At Itasca State Park, there's no blueberry pie this summer, since Douglas Lodge is closed due to the pandemic. But there are natural wonders: creeks, meadows, chipmunks, loons, time and memories.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT