Doug Leier

Doug Leier

North Dakota Game and Fish outreach biologist

Doug Leier is an outreach biologist for the North Dakota Game and Fish Department who writes frequent columns for Northland Outdoors. Reach him at dleier@nd.gov.

From license sales to excise taxes, membership in clubs and volunteering, hunters have always stepped up to try to improve the outdoor world.
Leaving game in the heat, or letting it get covered in rural road dust and insects is unfixable. Take care of your kill from the field to the fork.
In states like North Dakota, where a limited and specific number of deer licenses are issued by unit, party hunting could, in the long run, reduce a person’s chances of obtaining high-demand licenses, such as for whitetail and mule deer bucks.
Complaining about a situation you witnessed during deer or any other hunting season at the cafe, gas station, watering hole or at the high school game doesn’t help.
October through early December is also the peak period for deer-vehicle accidents.
If you don’t know for certain, check the Game and Fish Department deer hunting guide or ask a game warden.
No matter what North Dakota hunters may or may not be finding with pheasant and waterfowl seasons underway, here’s what the Game and Fish Department preseason numbers tabulated.
Hunters are encouraged to plan accordingly and be prepared to quarter a carcass, cape out an animal or clean a skull in the field, or find a taxidermist or meat locker within the unit or state who can assist.
It is important for the North Dakota Game Department to work with private landowners to manage wildlife and provide habitat and access.
The PLOTS Guide, which features information on walk-in tracts, also includes public land hunting access information, including more than 200 wildlife management areas totaling about 220,000 acres.