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The months-long debate about the proposed corn milling plant from Fufeng Group, a China-based agribusiness, has created a lot of discussion in and around Grand Forks since the plant was first announced in November, at times gaining national attention.

A few U.S. senators, including North Dakota's Kevin Cramer and John Hoeven, have called for a deeper look at the plant, which would sit about 12 miles away from Grand Forks Air Force Base. The company's ties to China, as well as worries about the environment and other concerns, have made for raucous city council meetings at times and a long process for local leaders. Get the latest headlines on the Fufeng controversy right here.


I am uncomfortable about China building a corn plant so close to Grand Forks Air Force Base.
With the possible creation of a corn mill in Grand Forks we will lose the spirit of what North Dakota means.
Rebecca Osowski is firmly against the proposed corn mill, while Tricia Lunski has grown more comfortable with the idea since the June election.
An oral hearing is scheduled for Thursday, Aug. 18, in Devils Lake

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Why would anyone want to do business with such an adversary?
What is really at stake is our ability to have control as citizens of this town.
Public comment lasted for more than an hour on Monday and was nearly entirely focused on the proposed Fufeng plant, which has generated controversy throughout the year after it was announced late in 2021
The Fufeng plant will be a huge polluter. It will produce more CO2 than all other sources in North Dakota and Minnesota except a few coal plants.
In an hour-long interview on the Plain Talk podcast, Sen. Kevin Cramer talks about the political issues making headlines today.
The concerns about national security are real. As an engineer, I look for evidence over marketing.

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Also in recent days, CNN has reported that equipment placed at sites in the U.S. by the Chinese telecommunications company Huawei has raised concern by the FBI. The city administrator, however, counters that the Huawei issue is much different since it's a telecommunications company, and not an agribusiness.
The threat of Chinese spying is very real. It's not some red scare fever dream.
The committee approved the agreement in a 5-1 vote, with Rebecca Osowski dissenting. Council member Kyle Kvamme was absent. Up next: The City Council will consider the agreement next week.

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