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Red River Valley Habitat for Humanity announces its first home dedication in six years

This is its 32nd home build and, according to a release, the beginning of "many more to come in the near future."

Red River Valley Habitat for Humanity.jpg
Red River Valley Habitat for Humanity announces its first home dedication in six years. (Jacob Holley/Grand Forks Herald)
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GRAND FORKS — The Red River Valley Habitat for Humanity announced its first home dedication in six years.

This is its 32nd home build and, according to a release, the beginning of "many more to come in the near future."

The Shern family, as well as Red River Valley Habitat for Humanity volunteers, are excited to celebrate with a public home dedication open to all Grand Forks residents and anyone from the surrounding areas from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. June 24 at 958 Thames Ct. in Grand Forks. There will be a house tour, pizza will be served and Pastor Jared Clausen of Freedom Church will provide a blessing.

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Individuals profiled this week include those from Ackerman-Estvold and Vantage Point Solutions.

Red River Valley Habitat for Humanity's purpose is to offer "a hand up, not a hand out" to its residents struggling with rent or mortgage payment exceeding 30% of their income, according to the release, and almost 20% of North Dakotans live in poverty.

Those wishing to attend should RSVP at www.rrvhabitat.com or by e-mailing executive director Marisa Sauceda at marisa@rrvhabitat.com.

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Jacob Holley joined the Grand Forks Herald as its business reporter in June 2021.

Holley's beat at the Grand Forks Herald is broad and includes a variety of topics, including small business, national trends and more.

Readers can reach Holley at jholley@gfherald.com.Follow him on Twitter @JakeHolleyMedia.
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