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Grand Forks' Pete Haga recognized with Traeger Award

Grand Forks has its own Chris Traeger -- Community and Government Relations Officer Pete Haga. Haga was recognized with the 2018 Chris Traeger Award by Engaging Local Government Leaders, which honors the top 100 influencers in local government. C...

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Pete Haga
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Grand Forks has its own Chris Traeger -- Community and Government Relations Officer Pete Haga.

Haga was recognized with the 2018 Chris Traeger Award by Engaging Local Government Leaders, which honors the top 100 influencers in local government. Chris Traeger was the city manager in the fictional city of Pawnee, Ind., on the NBC-TV show “Parks and Recreation.” Traeger was known for extreme energy and commitment to improving local government, according to ELGL’s website.

Haga was ranked 64 out of 100 on the Traeger list.

“This is just a lot of fun,” Haga said. “Everyone on that list is really passionate about local government, so this is a great honor.”

ELGL recognized Haga for his work on fighting the opioid crisis in North Dakota. He also was recognized for his work with the Knight Foundation to bring projects to Grand Forks, such as the “New Flavors” food truck.  

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All Traeger List influencers will be honored in May in Durham, N.C., at the ELGL conference.

Related Topics: PETE HAGA
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