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Grand Forks Downtown Development Association receives $100,000 Lowe's Hometown grant

The DDA is North Dakota’s only recipient of the award, the purpose of which is to restore and revitalize spaces serving as the hubs of communities. Only 100 recipients received the grant.

A crowd filling town square in downtown Grand Forks
A crowd filling town square in downtown Grand Forks enjoys music by Thief River Falls based blues group Little Bobby and the Storm at Blues on the Red, saturday, July 26. photo by Jenna Watson/Grand Forks Herald
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GRAND FORKS — The Grand Forks Downtown Development Association announced it was selected as a recipient of the $100,000 Lowe’s Hometown Grant.

The Grand Forks DDA is North Dakota’s only recipient of the award, the purpose of which is to restore and revitalize spaces serving as the hubs of communities. Only 100 recipients received the grant.

Through the grant and the DDA’s partnership with the City of Grand Forks, enhancements will be made to Town Square in downtown Grand Forks in order to provide a safer and more welcoming space year-round for people of all ages. The DDA also plans to provide a variety of placemaking pieces, programming and activity to the space which will benefit the Town Square farmers market, concerts and other events, as well as create an active space for all to enjoy.

Related Topics: BUSINESS BRIEFS
Jacob Holley joined the Grand Forks Herald as its business reporter in June 2021.

Holley's beat at the Grand Forks Herald is broad and includes a variety of topics, including small business, national trends and more.

Readers can reach Holley at jholley@gfherald.com.Follow him on Twitter @JakeHolleyMedia.
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