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GFK airport creates task force

Leaders at Grand Forks International Airport have created a task force to educate the business community about local air service. The GFK Air Service Task Force recently met with about 25 regional businesses, airport manager Ryan Riesinger said. ...

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April Baumgarten

Leaders at Grand Forks International Airport have created a task force to educate the business community about local air service.
The GFK Air Service Task Force recently met with about 25 regional businesses, airport manager Ryan Riesinger said. The goal of the meeting was to provide outreach and education about the dynamics of the air service industry and to collect information from companies to assist the airport with retention and recruitment.
“It was really just an open forum for communication about air service with local businesses,” he said.
Grand Forks boarding numbers in September were down 12 percent compared with the same month last year, according to numbers released Tuesday by the North Dakota Aeronautics Commission. The airport had 84,877 passengers, which is ahead of historic averages but behind oil boom counts.
North Dakota airports saw drops in boarding figures as the boom diminished, but those decreases appear to be leveling off.
About 770,000 passengers boarded planes at North Dakota airports for the year through September, with about 76,500 of those coming last month, according to the commission’s report. That’s about 1 percent less than that timeframe last year, and higher than historic averages.

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This piece was written for Prairie Business, which covers business in the Dakotas and Minnesota. To receive a free digital edition each month, see the instructions at the bottom of this story.
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