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Business Buzz: Acme Equipment to open new facility; Esports recruiting event planned at NDSU, and more

Check out what the business team is following this week

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Construction has begun on Acme Equipment at 680 36th St. S.W. in Fargo, directly north of Acme Tools. Acme Equipment is a division of Acme Tools focusing on equipment brands like Kubota.
Contributed / JLG Architects
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FARGO — Acme Equipment, a division of Acme Tools focusing on equipment brands, recently broke ground on a new 32,600-square-foot facility at 680 36th St. S. in Fargo, just north of the Acme Tools store and adjacent to the store's current equipment and rental lot.

Acme Tools closed on an asset purchase agreement with West Fargo-based Titan Machinery Inc. in April to acquire the new assets for Kubota, Cub Cadet, Grasshopper and Woods products from Fargo Tractor. Acme Equipment was approved by Kubota Tractor Corporation as the new Kubota dealer for the Fargo-Moorhead region in North Dakota and Minnesota. Kubota granted exclusive approval to Acme Equipment for all four of its product categories: Agriculture Tractors, Hay/Farm Implements, Construction Equipment and Turf products.

"Expanding Acme Equipment and our representation of the Kubota brand to the Fargo-Moorhead region increases our ability to serve our customers in the area with new equipment offerings to meet their needs," said Paul Kuhlman, co-president of Acme Tools, via a Monday, Oct. 3, news release.

Acme Tools in Fargo is supporting Kubota sales and service while the new Acme Equipment facility is under construction.

The new facility is scheduled to open in the fall of 2023.

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READ MORE ON ESPORTS PROGRAMS AT LOCAL COLLEGES
Competition is set to launch this winter, with the Cobbers joining the National Association of Collegiate Esports
You won't find a packed stadium or pep band at Moorhead High School's latest team competition. Middle school and senior high students are now part of Moorhead's first-ever esports team.
The school hopes to get students into the ever-growing career field.

Esports recruiting event planned at NDSU

Gravity Gaming by ByteSpeed will host the NAECAD Clinic and Esports Recruiting Event Oct. 28-29 at North Dakota State University's Memorial Union in Fargo.

The event is designed to connect high school students with colleges that offer esports programs and scholarships. It also features a coaches clinic with educational sessions highlighting the impact of scholastic esports through education, competition and careers.

In addition to a college recruiting fair, there will be speaker panels and keynote speeches from esports experts across the nation, networking sessions, roundtable discussions, vendor sponsor booths, and more.

Esports is one of the fastest growing industries worldwide, with more viewers than every professional sports league, with the exception of the NFL. More than 300 colleges across the nation now offer varsity esports programs.

For more information, visit bytespeed.com/naecad-esports-clinic/

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Richard Solberg is chairman of Bell Bank.
Special to The Forum

FMWF Chamber's annual meeting slated Oct. 18

The Fargo Moorhead West Fargo Chamber of Commerce will hold its annual meeting meeting and celebration from noon to 1:30 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 18, at Fargo's Delta by Marriott, 1635 42nd St. S.

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The event is an opportunity for Chamber members to celebrate the accomplishments of the last year and to look ahead to what next year has in store. It is also time to honor this year's Legacy Leader Richard Solberg, board chairman for Bell Bank .

From 1968 to 1982, Solberg worked for First National Bank in Grand Forks as well as Citizens State Bank in his native Finley, N.D. Solberg climbed to the role of CEO for Citizens State Bank in 1979.

In 1982, Solberg was named president and CEO of what was then State Bank of Fargo. Throughout Solberg's tenure with Bell Bank, the company expanded from one location in Fargo to several across North Dakota and Minnesota.

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