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5 Questions with Healing Hands by Heather

The Grand Forks Herald sat down with Heather Johnson, who started her business Healing Hands by Heather in November, 2021, for 5 Questions this week.

Healing Hands by Heather
Heather Johnson started Healing Hands by Heather in November, 2021.
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GRAND FORKS — The Grand Forks Herald sat down with Heather Johnson, who started her business Healing Hands by Heather in November 2021, for 5 Questions this week.

Q: How did you get into Massage Therapy?

A: I actually had a friend who was a massage therapist, and she kind of encouraged me. She said she thought I would like it, and then I kind of opened up my eyes to that desire of helping people and working one-on-one with people. So, I gave it a shot. I went to school, and it turns out that it's something that I'm very passionate about. I took a leap of faith, and I found my happy place.

Q: What different massage therapy services do you provide?

A: I provide a relaxation massage, a deep tissue massage and then aromatherapy, which is basically added essential oil onto a relaxation massage or deep tissue massage. I also specialize in pregnancy or prenatal massages.

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Q: What different things does massage therapy treat?

A: I'll use my clients here as examples. I see anybody from busy moms who just want that hour to themselves to relax and kind of refresh themselves. I see people with chronic migraines, chronic pain, I have clients that come in and the massage is called to treat conditions like multiple sclerosis or arthritis. So, it’s kind of a variety of things, whether it be relaxing or for therapeutic benefit.

Q: How do you comfort a new client that had a bad massage in the past or is skeptical of the process?

A: When I first meet a client, when they come in, I kind of give them the rundown, especially if they're new to massage, or if they have had massages in the past and they're kind of skeptical. They said, “Oh, I was in so much pain when I left,” or, “They were worked too hard on me,” I just kind of give them the rundown, like, “This is what I'm going to do,” and then really encourage that I am big on communication. I tell each client that this is their massage and they are in control. At any point, if any of the pressure is too much or not enough, I want them to have that open communication and feel that they can tell me so that they're getting exactly what they want and need.

Q: How do you maintain an environment that makes your customers feel safe and comfortable?

A: It’s putting them in a relaxing atmosphere, low lighting, making sure that draping is always making people feel comfortable, so if they're laying with hardly any clothes on on a table, they want to make sure that they're covered up with the blankets and the draping techniques are being done correctly. Making it a relaxing environment is number one — a mellow atmosphere with the candles and with the essential oil diffusing and soft music. That's the first step. As soon as they walk in the door, they feel comfortable, and that is actually something that I get complimented on a lot when people walk into my room is how soothing it is.

Related Topics: 5 QUESTIONS
Jacob Holley joined the Grand Forks Herald as its business reporter in June 2021.

Holley's beat at the Grand Forks Herald is broad and includes a variety of topics, including small business, national trends and more.

Readers can reach Holley at jholley@gfherald.com.Follow him on Twitter @JakeHolleyMedia.
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