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Carter Rowney has his day with the Stanley Cup

Carter Rowney and his family prepare for a parade with the Stanley Cup in his hometown of Sexsmith, Alberta. Photo @keeperofthecup on Twitter.

Carter Rowney stood in the back of an open wooden wagon, holding the Stanley Cup high over his head Sunday afternoon as his hometown of Sexsmith, Alberta, saluted the former UND player for winning hockey’s greatest prize.

Rowney had his day with the Stanley Cup on Sunday -- every player on the winning team gets 24 hours with the trophy -- and he spent part of it with his family and his northern Alberta town.

The parade lasted about 12 blocks in the town of roughly 2,500 people, then fans were able to take photos with the trophy.

Even Rowney’s new baby boy, Anders, took part in the festivities, donning a T-shirt that said, “I only drink out of sippy cups and Stanley Cups.”

Rowney played four years at UND from 2009-13.

After scoring just one goal as a freshman and three as a sophomore, Rowney broke out for an 18-goal junior season. He followed it up with a strong senior year, serving as an alternate captain of the team.

Rowney has been with Pittsburgh’s organization since turning pro, slowly climbing the ladder from the ECHL to the American Hockey League to the NHL.

Rowney was called up to the NHL in late January, remained there and played a key role as a penalty killer and a defensive forward during Pittsburgh’s run to the Cup.

Rowney led all Pittsburgh players in hits during the playoffs.

A UND player has been on the Stanley Cup-winning team in six of the last eight years. Jonathan Toews won it with the Chicago Blackhawks in 2010, 2013 and 2015. Matt Greene won it with the Los Angeles Kings in 2012 and 2014.

Each UND player who wins the Stanley Cup gets a plaque in the team’s locker room.

Ralph Engelstad Arena will have to make renovations to get Carter Rowney’s on the wall.

Brad Elliott Schlossman

Schlossman is in his 13th year covering college hockey for the Herald. In 2016, he was named the top beat writer in the country by the Associated Press Sports Editors. He has voted in the national college hockey poll since 2007 and has served as a member of the Hobey Baker and Patty Kazmaier Award committees.

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