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ASK YOUR GOVERNMENT: Plans for rebuilding streets?

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Each week, Herald reporter Charly Haley answers your questions about local government, laws and other local topics.

Q. Why are two of the worst stretches of highly traveled streets not being fixed this summer: South Columbia Road from 17th Avenue to 11th Avenue and 42nd Street from University Avenue to Gateway Drive?

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A. Since both of those projects qualify for federal funding, the construction schedules are based on the availability of those federal funds, according to City Engineer Al Grasser.

The Columbia Road project spanning from 11th Avenue South to 14th Avenue South is scheduled for 2016 construction, Grasser said.

The 42nd Street project is on the request for 2018 funding, he said. “If federal funds are not forthcoming, we will look at local funding options.”

Q. I have noticed while walking and driving that very few cars stop at pedestrian crossings when people are waiting to cross. What are the exact rules for drivers and pedestrians at intersections??

A. What you’re witnessing when drivers fail to yield is a traffic violation and could earn those motorists a ticket.

All vehicles should yield the right-of-way to pedestrians at all crosswalks in North Dakota, according to Lt. Dwight Love with the Grand Forks Police Department.

If a driver fails to give those people a chance to cross the street then he or she could receive a $50 fine.

Of course, pedestrians shouldn’t assume this give them the go-ahead to walk out into intersections without acknowledging traffic.

Love suggests pedestrians let their intent to cross the street known by making eye contact with the driver or waiting a beat to make sure the driver is going to remain stopped and let them cross.

Herald staff writer Brandi Jewett contributed to this column.

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Charly Haley
Charly Haley covers city government for the Grand Forks Herald. As night reporter, she also has many general assignments. Before working at the Herald, she was a reporter at the Jamestown Sun and interned at The Forum of Fargo-Moorhead, Detroit Lakes Newspapers and the St. Cloud Times. Haley is a graduate of Minnesota State University Moorhead, and her hometown is Sartell, Minn.
(701) 780-1102
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